Speaking of Tires…

We usually become proactive in tire maintenance as the season changes.  And the season will change sooner than we probably expect.  Here is some ‘tire talk’ for you to prepare for that moment of ‘change’.

How long do tires last?

40 years ago, the average life expectancy of a tire was not more than 2 years!  Today it is best to change your tires after every 6 years at least.  After tires hit a life span of 6 years, they should be discarded. This is because rubber loses its elasticity and resistance properties over that period.  Ultimately, the life expectancy of a tire greatly depends on its maintenance, environmental conditions and the driving style of the driver.

Factor Affecting the Life of Tires

  • Climatic Conditions – If you stay near the beach or if it rains a lot in your area, the chances are the moisture in the air will ruin the rubber faster.
  • Road Conditions – A bumpy ride can also reduce your tire’s life
  • Exposure to Sun – Simply put, the more the exposure to the sun, the sooner the tire ages.
  • Other Factors – Avoid exceeding the total limit of weight allowed for your tires to carry.
  • Quality of Maintenance – How long you can use tires depends a lot on how you took care of it in the first place. When the tires are neglected or the wheel alignment is not correct, it will accelerate the aging process.

How to Extend Your Tire’s Life

Tire life can be increased by taking a few simple steps which will help protect them from premature rotting:

  • Check your tires for proper inflation pressures on a monthly basis. Buy and use a good digital tire gauge even though your tires may be equipped with tire pressure monitors. Do not use the maximum pounds per square inch (PSI) noted on the tire’s sidewall as the measure for proper inflation; the recommended PSI for your vehicle’s tires is located on the driver’s side door jamb or in the owner’s manual for your car. Under- or over-inflation of your tires inhibits the effectiveness of stabilizing additives found in most tires.
  • Park your car in a garage or carport to decrease the tires’ exposure to the elements.  Protection from excessive heat and UV rays will help protect your tires from premature rot.
  • Apply a tire conditioner that is formulated to protect tires from UV rays and/or ozone. Household cleansers and petrochemical or silicone containing tire cleaning products can actually remove much of the tire’s protective waxes.
  • Drive the car regularly and at moderate speeds. Car tires that sit, unmoving, for long periods of time do not flex. Therefore, the stabilizing additives do not distribute as designed.
  • Buy new tires that were manufactured no more than two years prior. Dates are located on one side of each tire, and use numbers that coincide with week and year of manufacture. For example, 1209 means it was made in the twelfth week of 2009. Ask for tires that have UV stabilizers and ozone shielding additives.

  • Outside edges: tires that are worn on the outside edges have been under inflated.
  • Center of tire: tires that are worn in the center have been over inflated.
  • One of the edges: when the tire is worn on one side but not the other the camber angle is off either negative or positive. (Positive camber: is when the top of the tire leans away from the vehicle. Negative camber is when the top of the tire leans in towards the vehicle. This can also be caused by bent or damaged front end parts: tie rods, ball joints, etc.)
  • Tire is feathered: when the tire is feathered across the tread the tie rods are worn or the vehicle needs to be aligned.
  • Tire is scalloped: when the tire is scalloped or cupped across the tread it is usually caused by bad shocks or struts. This can also be caused by out of balance tires.

Rotate Your Tires

When tire rotation is done at the recommended times, it can preserve balanced handling and traction and even out tire wear. Tire rotation can even provide performance advantages.

Many tire mileage warranties require tire rotation to keep the warranty valid. When should tires be rotated? We recommend that tires be rotated every 6,000 to 10,000Km even if they don’t show signs of wear.  Consider tire rotation with oil change intervals while the vehicle is off the ground.

Tire rotation helps even out tire wear by allowing each tire to serve in as many of the vehicle’s wheel positions as possible. Remember, tire rotation can’t correct wear problems due to worn mechanical parts or incorrect inflation pressures.

If you maintain your tires, observe the wear on your tires, rotate your tires and recognize a tire has a life of it’s own, you will maximize it. If you need new tires, try our ‘Tire Finder‘ tool.  Search by year, make, model and tire size and we will show you quality new tires that fit your vehicle.

JBA Chevrolet
7327 Ritchie Highway
Glen Burnie, MD
443-763-5076

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2013 Chevy Silverado

The 2013 Chevrolet Silverado was built with purpose, not just for good looks.

For the 2013 model year, the Chevy Silverado 1500 and Hybrid models receive a few minimal changes — the most notable of which are three new colors, including Deep Ruby Metallic, White Diamond Tricoat, and Blue Topaz Metallic. Conversely, the Imperial Blue Metallic and Black Granite metallic colors are gone.

In addition, the 2013 Silverado gets a set of all-terrain tires (rather than the on-/off-road units found on the 2012 models), while a few LPO (Limited Promotional Option) options are discontinued, including the sliding bed divider, cargo management system rails, overhead utility rack, and the enough-to-make-a-rapper jealous deluxe chrome package.

Chevy has always been known to dominate in the amount of horsepower per cubic inch. Any racetrack will lend creed to this by Chevy’s pure dominance. The 2013 Chevy Silverado 1500 crew cab LS has a small 4.8-liter V8 which produces 302 horsepower with 305 pounds foot of torque. This results in the ability to carry 1,708 pounds of payload or tow 4,400 pounds and accelerate from 0 to 60 in 7.1 seconds flat.

If this isn’t enough, the Silverado also has stability control that works with the ABS four-wheel disc brakes to prevent excessive body roll. Controlled by the ECU, the truck senses the beginning of excessive roll, as experienced in a panic maneuver or very hard turn. In response the stability control with the help of the ABS unit, the front and rear brakes on the side opposite the turn are engaged. This will shallow the turn and slow the vehicle making it difficult to roll over or lose control. This is hailed as a great piece of technology.

We have 2013 Chevy Silverado models on the lot, stop by, take one out for a test drive and let us know what you think… and don’t forget about the Chevy Confidence Guarantee!

JBA Chevrolet
7327 Ritchie Highway
Glen Burnie, MD
443-763-5076

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